Feed on
Posts

Writer’s block

thinking-man[en]

This is an expanded version of an older post.

Many writers and probably many bloggers are faced with the typical writer’s block. While this block doesn’t affect many writers who operate in a productivity setting, it does afflict those who need the spark of creativity to express something bright and new.

True creative expression goes through cycles; the similarity between creativity and procreativity is not just linguistic. Both follow cycles and peaks like the female reproductive cycle.

Parecchi scrittori e probabilmente diversi blogger affrontano il tipico blocco dello scrittore. Mentre questo blocco colpisce pochi scrittori che operano in un ambiente produttivo, tipicamente coinvolge invece coloro che necessitano di un lampo creativo per esprimere qualcosa di fresco e innovativo.

L’autentica espressione creativa passa attraverso dei cicli; le somiglianze tra la creatività e la procreatività non sono solo linguistiche. Entrambe seguono cicli e vette come il ciclo riproduttivo femminile.

In the astrological tradition, both the creative and sexual expressions are at home in the fifth house, telling us that symbolically the creative forces in the universe derive from the same archetype. People who have high libidos often have some kind of artistic or creative quality as well.

The Latin word oestrus was used to mean “frenzy, driven by desire, mad impulse.” There’s a compulsive quality in this, a drive to act, just as compulsive as sex can be, being the most (pro)creative energy in the world.

[/en][it]

Questa è una versione espansa di un post che avevo pubblicato in precedenza.

Parecchi scrittori e probabilmente diversi blogger affrontano il tipico blocco dello scrittore. Mentre questo blocco colpisce pochi scrittori che operano in un ambiente produttivo, tipicamente coinvolge invece coloro che necessitano di un lampo creativo per esprimere qualcosa di fresco e innovativo.

L’autentica espressione creativa passa attraverso dei cicli; le somiglianze tra la creatività e la procreatività non sono solo linguistiche. Entrambe seguono cicli e vette come il ciclo riproduttivo femminile.

Nella tradizione astrologica, entrambe le espressioni creative e sessuali si trovano nella quinta casa. La simbologia ci suggerisce che le forze creative dell’universo derivano dallo stesso archetipo. Le persone con una forte libido spesso possiedono anche delle capacità creative o artistiche.

In the astrological tradition, both the creative and sexual expressions are at home in the fifth house, telling us that symbolically the creative forces in the universe derive from the same archetype. People who have high libidos often have some kind of artistic or creative quality as well.

The latin word oestrus was used to mean frenzy, driven by desire, mad impulse. There’s a compulsive quality in this, a drive to act, just as compulsive as sex can be, being the most (pro)creative energy in the world.

The process of creative revelation and the eureka effect has been documented by neurophysiological researches. Joseph Chilton Pearce in The Biology of Transcendence (Inner Traditions International. Rochester. 2002), referring to Margharita Laski’s work on Ecstasy, illustrates the six stages of the discovery process: 1. Asking the question. 2. Looking for the answer. 3. Hitting the plateau period. 4. Giving up the search for a solution. 5. The answer comes as the eureka effect. 6. Translating the discovery in a way that can be understood and shared by others.

This six stage process involves different parts of the brain. Both brain hemispheres are involved, as well as the emotional-limbic brain, which is itself the connection to the heart. Without the passion of the heart, the creative discovery seems difficult to reach. It reminds me of a book by Almaas saying that “Love of truth for its own sake is actually the expression of essential heart.”

What is usually not accepted in our hyper-productive culture that fears silence and the void is that fourth stage of giving up the search for a solution. Even though everybody has the experience of finding a solution or an insight when the mind wasn’t actively searching for it, the general attitude is to push for a solution, not accepting that empty stage. Quoting Joseph Chilton Pearce, “The corpus callosum can complete the circuitry only when the left hemisphere is inactive, when the analytical and critical processes of mind are suspended.” Without knowing anything about neurophysiology, most of the spiritual teachers say that there is a stage of giving up the search and that the condition of not-knowing is necessary for any true insight on ourselves. So the eureka effect path seems to apply both to personal insights and to scientific or artistic works. Given this vision, the writer’s block is not just natural, is even needed for every important creative outcome.

La parola latina oestrus veniva usata per significare frenesia, essere guidati dal desiderio, impulso folle. C’è una qualità compulsiva in ciò, una spinta all’azione, quanto può essere compulsiva la sessualità, come l’energia più fortemente (pro)creativa.

[/it]

[en]

The process of creative revelation and the eureka effect have been documented by neurophysiological research. Joseph Chilton Pearce in The Biology of Transcendence (Rochester: Inner Traditions, 2002), referring to Margharita Laski’s work on Ecstasy, illustrates the six stages of the discovery process: (1) Asking the question; (2) Looking for the answer; (3) Hitting the plateau period; (4) Giving up the search for a solution; (5) The answer comes as the eureka effect; and (6) Translating the discovery in a way that can be understood and shared by others.

This six-stage process involves different parts of the brain. Both brain hemispheres are involved, as well as the emotional-limbic brain, which is itself the connection to the heart. Without the passion of the heart, the creative discovery seems difficult to achieve. It reminds me of a book by Almaas saying, “Love of truth for its own sake is actually the expression of essential heart.”

What is usually not accepted in our hyper-productive culture that fears silence and the void is the fourth stage of giving up the search for a solution. Even though everybody has the experience of finding a solution or an insight when the mind wasn’t actively searching for it, the general attitude is to push for a solution, not accepting that empty stage. Quoting Joseph Chilton Pearce, “The corpus callosum can complete the circuitry only when the left hemisphere is inactive, when the analytical and critical processes of mind are suspended.”

The eureka effect has been documented by Tufts University researchers, coordinated by Sal Soraci, using an electroencephalograph which registered the moment when the fog surrounding a problem melts and shows the passage toward insight. Researchers presented sentences to subjects that at first glance made no sense.

Subjects became mute and a bit confused. After a few seconds the researchers gave them a cue, as for instance, “The girl spilled her popcorn because the lock broke” and then the cue “lion cage” which activated the eureka effect. About 400 milliseconds after the key word is read, revealing the meaning of the sentence, electrodes on the scalp pick up a pulse, called an N400.

In another experiment, Soraci showed subjects a blurred object and, while slowly bringing it into focus, the brain was attempting to interpret the image (for instance, “Is that a doughnut? A wheel?” until, instead, a watch emerged in the picture). The researcher said that the wrong assumptions could create the base for a better memory and learning process and that this discovery could bring about a different method of teaching in schools. His hypothesis is that the more the brain attempts to figure out a concept, the better it remembers it.

If this is the case, then the immediate answers we look for in Google actually are going to inhibit the search, removing us prematurely from the search field, from the connection, even spiritual, with the universal source of knowledge.

Without knowing anything about neurophysiology, most spiritual teachers say that there is a stage of giving up the search and that the condition of not-knowing is necessary for any true insight on ourselves.

Going through a state of an empty mind is typically recommended by Zen but, with less emphasis on it, every deep path of self-knowledge requires the acceptance that the mind in certain stages doesn’t have anything to say and doesn’t even know what to say.

The path of the eureka effect can be applied both to personal insights and to scientific or artistic work. Given this vision, writer’s block is not just natural, it is even needed for every important creative outcome.

The state of mental rest is being denied by the many media present in our life, especially when we are connected to the Net, so we have to do an act of will to find moments where we are disconnected from any network (TV, radio, SMS, phone, the Internet).

In body building it is known that to get optimal results it is necessary to alternate between activity and rest. The growth of muscles takes place during the night when they are in their most relaxed state. To exercise excessively brings the opposite results. Body building science is now very accurate regarding training paces and results.

It is surprising that on the mental level there are few studies regarding the physiology and psychology of knowledge given that most people are spending much more time on information rather than in the gym. And it is indeed surprising that people who are active in the learning and knowledge areas don’t know when a stop is needed and how to apply their resources to their best.

The mind tends to enter a hyperactive state, greedy of novelties due to its own nature and to keep an ego identity.

Our soul feels at ease even in emptiness – but this is a threat for the ego.

[/en][it]

Il processo della rivelazione creativa e l’effetto eureka sono stati documentati dalle ricerche neurofisiologiche. Joseph Chilton Pearce in The Biology of Transcendence (Inner Traditions International. Rochester. 2002), riferendosi al lavoro di Margharita Laski dal titolo Ecstasy, illustra le sei fasi del processo di scoperta: 1. Formulare la domanda. 2. Cercare una risposta. 3. Raggiungere la fase di altopiano 4. Rinunciare alla ricerca di una soluzione. 5. La risposta arriva nella forma dell’effetto eureka. 6. Tradurre la scoperta in un modo che può essere compreso e condiviso dagli altri.

Questo processo in sei fasi coinvolge diverse parti del cervello. Sono coinvolti entrambi gli emisferi del cervello, così come il cervello limbico-emozionale, che rappresenta la connessione col cuore. Senza la passione del cuore, la scoperta creativa semba difficile da raggiungere. Mi ricorda la frase di un libro di Almaas dove dice “L’amore della verità fine a se stessa è in realtà l’espressione dell’essenza del cuore”.

Ciò che solitamente non viene accettato nella nostra cultura iperproduttiva che teme il silenzio e il vuoto è la quarta fase, quella della rinuncia alla ricerca di una soluzione. Nonostante tutti quanti abbiamo avuto l’esperienza del trovare una soluzione o del raggiungere una comprensione intuitiva quando la mente non era attiva nella ricerca, l’atteggiamento generale è quello di spingere per una soluzione, senza accettare la fase del vuoto. Citando Joseph Chilton Pearce, “Il corpo calloso può chiudere il circuito solo quando l’emisfero sinistro non è attivo, quando i processi analitici e critici della mente vengono sospesi”.

L’effetto Eureka è stato documentato dai ricercatori della Tufts University, coordinati da Sal Soraci, usando un elettroencefalografo che ha registrato il momento in cui si scioglievano le nebbie che avvolgevano un problema e avveniva il passaggio verso la comprensione. I ricercatori hanno presentato ai soggetti delle frasi che a prima vista non avevano senso.

I soggetti rimanevano senza parole e un po’ confusi. Dopo alcuni secondi i ricercatori pronunciavano una parola che svelava il significato della frase. Ad esempio “la ragazza ha rovesciato i pop-corn perché la serratura si è rotta”, quindi viene dato un indizio: “la gabbia del leone”, che innesca l’effetto Eureka. Dopo circa 400 millisecondi che la parola era stata pronunciata, gli elettrodi leggevano un impulso chiamato N400.

In un altro esperimento Soraci ha mostrato degli oggetti sfuocati e, man mano che li metteva a fuoco il cervello cercava di interpretare l’immagine (ad esempio, “è una ciambella? una ruota?” finché non emergeva un orologio). Il ricercatore afferma che le supposizioni sbagliate potrebbero essere la base per una memoria e un apprendimento migliore e che questa scoperta potrebbe portare ad un modo diverso di insegnare nelle scuole. La sua ipotesi è che più il cervello prova ad afferrare il concetto, meglio questo sarà ricordato.

Se questo è il caso, allora le risposte immediate che cerchiamo con Google in realtà inibiscono la ricerca, ci tolgono prematuramente dal campo della ricerca, dalla connessione, anche spirituale, con la fonte universale delle conoscenze.

Senza aver alcuna nozione di neurofisiologia, la maggior parte dei mistici e degli insegnanti spirituali hanno affermato che vi è una fase in cui bisogna lasciare la ricerca e che la condizione del non-sapere è necessaria per una autentica comprensione di noi stessi.

Attraversare uno stato di mente vuota viene raccomandato tipicamente nello Zen ma, con minore enfasi, ogni percorso profondo di autoconoscenza presuppone di accettare che la mente in certe fasi non abbia niente da dire e non sappia neppure cosa dire.

Il percorso che porta all’effetto eureka pare si può applicare sia alle comprensioni interiori che ai settori scientifici e artistici. Sulla base di questa visione, il blocco dello scrittore non è solo naturale, è addirittura necessario per ogni sviluppo creativo importante.

Lo stato di pace mentale viene negato dai numerosi media presenti nella nostra vita, in particolare quando siamo connessi alla Rete, dovendo intraprendere un atto di volontà per trovare dei momenti in cui siamo disconnessi da qualsiasi rete (televisione, radio, SMS, telefono, Internet).

Nel body building si sa che per ottenere dei risultati ottimali è necessario alternare attività e riposo. La crescita dei muscoli avviene durante la notte quando questi si trovano nella loro condizione più rilassata. Esercitarsi eccessivamente porta a risultati opposti. La scienza del body building è oramai molto accurata per quanto riguarda regimi di allenamento e risultati.

E’ sorprendente che a livello mentale vi siano pochissimi studi concernenti la fisiologia e psicologia della conoscenza, quando la maggior parte delle persone passano molto più tempo nel mondo delle informazioni che in palestra. E’ pure sorprendente che le persone attive nei settori dello studio e della conoscenza, non sappiano quando fermarsi e come applicare le proprie risorse al meglio.

La mente tende ad entrare in uno stato iperattivo, per sua stessa natura famelica di novità, e per mantenere un ego e una identità.

Il nostro spirito si trova a nostro agio anche nel vuoto, ma questo è una minaccia per l’ego.

[/it]

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0
This work is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0.