Feed on
Posts

Biotech as an information system

<h1><a xhref="http://www.indranet.org/?attachment_id=70">geopoliticus-child-watching-the-birth-of-the-new-man.jpg</a></h1>[en]

The race toward the digitalization of reality has never slowed down, and it has resulted in a perception of the universe as an information processing system. The digitalization of reality has spread to the biological system and has been accelerated with the DNA sequencing of Human Genome Project.

Then scientists discovered that RNA, previously considered junk, regulates protein production and regulates genetic expression. Sequencing RNA and the classification of proteins will probably require billions of times the computational power needed for the Human Genome Project in 2005.

Biology and physics can express themselves on an informational level as well, but this doesn't mean that this is the only level where we can understand their nature.

[/en][it]

La corsa verso la digitalizzazione della realtà non si è mai arrestata e ha creato la percezione dell’universo come di un sistema di elaborazione delle informazioni. La digitalizzazione della realtà ha raggiunto il sistema biologico e ha subito un’accelerazione con la mappatura del DNA tramite il Progetto Genoma Umano.

Quindi gli scienziati hanno scoperto che l’RNA, precedentemente considerato spazzatura, regola la produzione di proteine e l’espressione genetica.  Sequenziare l’RNA e classificare le proteine richiederà probabilmente una capacità di calcolo miliardi di volte più grande di quella necessaria per il Progetto Genoma Umano del 2005.

La Biologia e la Fisica possono esprimersi a livello delle informazioni, ma questo non vuol dire che esso sia l’unico livello in cui possiamo comprendere la loro natura.

[/it][en]

The computer industry has seen an incredible development since the advent of the personal computers, but still computers aren't effective at all at many tasks that are effortless for humans, such as pattern recognition or understanding natural language, and they are even less capable in the realms of creativity, emotions, consciousness, ethics, philosophy. Those tasks weren't available to computers in the early eighties when Japan's government wasted incredible amounts of money on the Fifth Generation Computer Systems project which was supposed to develop artificial intelligence capabilities, and they are still not available today.

Nonetheless, the race toward the digitalization of reality has never slowed down, and it has resulted in a perception of the universe as an information processing system. Probably the silicon computers are heading toward their limits. Of course the development of computers will continue to enhance their power and features, but it seems to me that we arrived at the limits of what a computer can “do”. Anything that is being done now will be done faster and with more features but to take them to another level, humans will have to be involved. So real people are communicating with each other and contributing to give power to technology as an extension of the computers, and at the same time humans themselves are seen more and more as an information system, especially human biology.

The digitalization of reality has spread to the biological system and has been accelerated with the DNA sequencing of Human Genome Project. That project required an incredible amount of number crunching. The Human Genome Project sequenced less than 2 percent of the total length of the human genome. The rest was considered junk DNA since it didn't serve as protein coding.

Then a few scientists started to doubt the uselessness of the 98-99% remaining sequence (you really  have to be a genius to come up with that thought, right?). Some very primitive organisms contain hundreds of times the DNA of a human, so most probably the small amount of human DNA is not the whole story for our biology. Therefore, scientists discovered that RNA, previously considered junk, regulates protein production and regulates genetic expression. Genes aren't something that control our life, they can be inhibited or expressed according to the "junk DNA" sequences and I suspect by other factors such as thoughts and cultural influences. Then there is the proteomics project, the cataloging of our proteins. As humans it has been evaluated that we have more than two millions proteins, each with a different function, and around 25,000 genes that can produce a limited numbers of proteins. Accordingly the new race is now in sequencing the 98-99% of the DNA that hasn’t yet been sequenced, classificating proteins, understanding the mechanisms of gene activation and protein production.

Sequencing RNA and the classification of proteins will probably require billions of times the computational power needed for the Human Genome Project in 2005. But then proteins interact with each others, and I guess scientists would then like to understand their combinations and their role in health. This will require other orders of magnitude calculations. I can prefigure that other factors will come to the surface once the end (if ever) of those sequencings and calculations will be approached, requiring even more computational power. For instance, what about the interactions between two people’s DNA or between entire groups? If human biology is to be seen as an information system then there will be no end to the possibilities of combining elements. This race seems to be an endless search for the elementary particles in physics and the construction of longer and longer particle colliders.

I don't have anything against seeing reality through information lenses. Numbers, patterns and calculations always fascinated me and I am filled with awe when I see the computational patterns of life in biology and physics. But the map is not the territory. Biology and physics can express themselves on an informational level as well, but this doesn't mean that this is the only level where we can understand their nature. It's like saying that human beings are made of the minerals found in different proportions on the table of elements. That's the material physical reality level but we won't discover much about human beings even with the most accurate calculations of every element.
Furthermore, there is the false impression that information reveals the real nature of the universe in the case of elementary particles or when it comes to human beings in the case of sequencing DNA and proteins. The deep mystery in that approach will remain but we try to allay our anxiety for the unknown in deluding ourselves that we know the universe by collecting data that we can store, interpret, control and manipulate.

Our scientific development looks for the truth mainly on the objective and informational levels, therefore is not surprising that we consider information as the fundamental nature of human beings or the universe itself. In this era we identify ourselves with our genes and DNA, believing it determines our physical, intellectual, emotional and even ethical attributes. At a certain point some wise ass will tell us which parts of our DNA are better than others.

When we'll reach a complete map of everybody's DNA ("junk" DNA included) and proteins, when we will see that the manipulation of genes won't give the desired results and probably will just impoverish the inherent creativity and biodiversity of nature, then we will probably finally shift our sense of identity, expanding it to include the biological informational level in a wider embrace.

See also:

Virtual worlds, mirror worlds, Second Life: backing up the messed planet 

Mechanisms, mysticism and Amazon Mechanical Turk 

Zen archery and computers

Lifelogging 

The heart of the binary code 

Downloading our life on Internet 

Google, privacy and the need to be seen

[/en][it]

L’industria del computer ha visto un incredibile sviluppo in seguito all’avvento del personal computer, ma quest’ultimo non è ancora capace di svolgere molti compiti che agli esseri umani non richiedono sforzi, come riconoscere le forme o comprendere il linguaggio naturale, mentre è ancora più inadeguato per quanto riguarda dimensioni come creatività, emozioni, consapevolezza, etica e filosofia. I computer non erano capaci di svolgere questi compiti all’inizio degli anni Ottanta – quando il governo del Giappone sprecò un’incredibile quantità di soldi nel progetto dei computer di Quinta Generazione, che avrebbe dovuto sviluppare le facoltà dell’intelligenza artificiale – né lo sono tuttora.

Ciononostante, la corsa verso la digitalizzazione della realtà non si è mai arrestata e ha creato la percezione dell’universo come di un sistema di elaborazione delle informazioni. Probabilmente, i computer al silicio stanno raggiungendo il limite massimo del loro sviluppo. Naturalmente, l’evoluzione dei computer continuerà e le caratteristiche e la potenza di questi ultimi miglioreranno, ma mi sembra che siamo arrivati al limite di ciò che un computer può “fare”. Tutto ciò che oggi viene fatto verrà svolto con più velocità e precisione, ma per passare a un altro livello, saranno necessari gli esseri umani. Quindi, le persone in carne e ossa, mentre da un lato comunicano tra loro contribuendo allo sviluppo tecnologico dei computer, dall’altro vengono viste esse stesse – soprattutto la loro biologia – come un sistema di informazioni.

La digitalizzazione della realtà ha raggiunto il sistema biologico e ha subito un’accelerazione con la mappatura del DNA tramite il Progetto Genoma Umano. Quel progetto ha richiesto una quantità incredibile di number crunching [elaborazioni numeriche], ma ha sequenziato meno del 2 percento della lunghezza totale del genoma umano. Il resto è stato considerato DNA spazzatura, in quanto non veniva usato per codificare le proteine.

Successivamente, alcuni scienziati hanno cominciato a dubitare dell’inutilità di quel 98-99 percento di sequenza rimanente (bisogna essere davvero dei geni per pensare una cosa simile, vero?). Alcuni organismi molto primitivi contengono centinaia di volte il DNA di un essere umano, quindi probabilmente la piccola quantità di DNA umano non rappresenta tutta la nostra biologia. Di conseguenza, gli scienziati hanno scoperto che l’RNA, precedentemente considerato spazzatura, regola la produzione di proteine e l’espressione genetica. I geni non sono qualcosa che controlla la nostra vita: possono essere inibiti o espressi dalle sequenze di “DNA spazzatura” e ritengo anche da altri fattori, come il pensiero e le influenze culturali. Poi c’è il Progetto Proteomics, la catalogazione delle nostre proteine. È stato calcolato che gli esseri umani hanno più di due milioni di proteine, ciascuna con una funzione diversa, e circa 25.000 geni in grado di produrre un numero limitato di proteine. Di conseguenza, la nuova gara consiste nel sequenziare il 98-99 percento di DNA che non è stato sequenziato, classificare le proteine e comprendere i meccanismi dell’attivazione dei geni e della produzione di proteine.

Sequenziare l’RNA e classificare le proteine richiederà probabilmente una capacità di calcolo miliardi di volte più grande di quella necessaria per il Progetto Genoma Umano del 2005. E siccome le proteine interagiscono tra loro, penso che gli scienziati vorranno anche comprendere le combinazioni tra esse e il ruolo che svolgono nella salute. Questo richiederà ulteriori calcoli di enorme complessità. Posso prevedere che, quando ci si avvicinerà alla fine (se mai avverrà) di questi calcoli e mappature, entreranno in scena altri fattori che richiederanno capacità di calcolo ancora maggiori. Che dire, per esempio, delle interazioni tra i DNA di due persone o di interi gruppi? Se la biologia umana viene considerata come un sistema informativo, non ci sarà fine alla possibilità di combinare elementi. Questa corsa ricorda la ricerca infinita delle particelle elementari in Fisica e la costruzione di acceleratori di particelle sempre più grandi.

Non ho nulla in contrario a vedere la realtà attraverso le lenti delle informazioni. Numeri, calcoli e modelli mi hanno sempre affascinato e sono pieno di meraviglia quando vedo i modelli di calcolo della vita in Biologia e in Fisica. Tuttavia, la mappa non è il territorio. La Biologia e la Fisica possono esprimersi a livello delle informazioni, ma questo non vuol dire che esso sia l’unico livello in cui possiamo comprendere la loro natura. È come dire che gli esseri umani sono fatti dei minerali trovati in proporzioni diverse nella tavola degli elementi. Quello è il livello della realtà materiale, ma nemmeno con i più accurati calcoli di ogni elemento scopriremmo molto sugli esseri umani. Inoltre, c’è l’impressione erronea che le informazioni sulle particelle elementari rivelino la vera natura dell’universo, e quelle sulla sequenza del DNA e sulle proteine la natura dell’uomo. Questo approccio lascerà intatto il mistero profondo, ma noi vogliamo illuderci che conosceremo l’universo accumulando dati che possiamo immagazzinare, interpretare, controllare e manipolare.

La nostra evoluzione scientifica cerca la verità soprattutto a livello oggettivo e delle informazioni, quindi non sorprende che consideriamo queste ultime come la natura fondamentale degli esseri umani o dell’universo stesso. In questa epoca ci identifichiamo con i nostri geni e il DNA, credendo che quest’ultimo determini i nostri attributi fisici, intellettuali, emotivi e persino etici. A un certo punto qualche sapientone ci dirà quali parti del DNA sono meglio delle altre.

Quando avremo raggiunto una mappa completa del DNA (DNA “spazzatura” incluso) e delle proteine di ognuno, quando vedremo che la manipolazione dei geni non ci darà i risultati desiderati e anzi, probabilmente impoverirà la creatività e la biodiversità innate della natura, allora probabilmente cambieremo il nostro senso di identità, espandendolo fino a includere il livello delle informazioni biologiche in un abbraccio più grande.

Vedi anche:

Mondi virtuali, mondi specchio, Second Life: fare il backup di un pianeta nel caos

Meccanismi, misticismi e Mechanical Turk di Amazon

Il tiro con l'arco Zen e i computer

Lifelogging

Il cuore del codice binario

Download della vita su Internet

Google, la privacy e il mettersi in mostra

[/it] 

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0
This work is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0.