Feed on
Posts

Computer addiction as survival for the ego

<h1><a xhref=[en]

Our nervous system has the mechanism of a reward system that, when activated, can trigger the processes of compulsions and addictions. In the Internet, people can get addicted to online gambling, to online gaming, to porn, to cybersex, to online auctions, to chat, even to news and to surfing. Neuroscientists have also documented how the learning and the pleasure centers of the brain are the same.

My hypothesis is that addictions that have to do with the mind activity, such as computer addiction, are there in order to keep the mind busy and therefore surviving. A silent mind would mean no-mind; silence and stillness are the worse enemy for the ego, that breeds thoughts continuously and feeds on them.

[/en][it]

Il nostro sistema nervoso possiede un meccanismo di gratificazione che, una volta attivato, può provocare processi compulsivi e di dipendenza. Su Internet, le persone possono diventare dipendenti dal gioco d’azzardo o i videogame online, la pornografia, il cybersex, le aste online, le chat, persino le news e il navigare in sé. I neuroscienziati hanno documentato anche come i centri cerebrali dell’apprendimento e del piacere siano gli stessi.

La mia ipotesi che è le dipendenze connesse all’attività mentale, come la dipendenza da computer, seguono un meccanismo simile per tenere la mente occupata, e quindi farla sopravvivere. Una mente silenziosa significherebbe una non-mente; il silenzio e l’immobilità sono i peggiori nemici dell’ego, che genera e si nutre continuamente di pensieri.

[/it][en]

Our nervous system has the mechanism of a reward system that, when activated, can trigger the processes of compulsions and addictions. Dopamine is one of the neurotransmitters found in the nervous system, influences mood and feelings and has an important role in the motivation and reward systems. A reward system is a modality of the brain structures which regulate behavior by inducing pleasurable effects

The two most powerful drugs, heroine and cocaine, stimulate dopamine activity in the nervous system. In specific, heroin increases the neuronal firing rate of dopamine cells and cocaine inhibits the reuptake of dopamine. In both cases there is a mood enhancing quality that craves to repeat the experience, even though the feeling experience of those drugs is different. Repeated use can deplete dopamine in the nervous system and normal rewards lose their motivational appeal thus giving space to the addiction mechanism. These physiological changes are probably necessary in order to produce a real addiction.

The reward system is also activated by natural rewards, such as food, water, sex. They are intrinsically pleasurable in order to motivate people to survive and preserve the species. Sometimes those natural reward systems can become addictive too, but the simple activation of brain reward system is not an addiction in itself. An addictive behaviour is defined as the inability of normal rewards to direct behaviour. For instance, food, sex, work, family, health can be neglected due to addiction. While some substances, such as heroin and cocaine are very addictive and control people’s behaviour in an extreme way, others have a lesser influence.

With the huge development of technology and more and more people arriving to the net, spending more and more time online and having faster and faster connections, there is a growing number of people that are caught in this net.

People can get addicted to online gambling, to online gaming, to porn, to cybersex, to online auctions, to chat, even to news and to surfing. Neuroscientists have also documented how the learning and the pleasure centers of the brain are the same. Having a new idea, even if not addictive in itself, causes a release of euphoria-producing neurochemicals, such as dopamine and endorphins. Edgar Morin writes about the “cognitive obsessions”:

What stimulates research is at the same time what pollutes it and deceives it when the anxious pressing question, bringer of existential anguish and torments, automatically and necessarily brings about a helpful (and wished for) answer. The answer that “makes us feel well” and even gives us a psychic pleasure close to physical pleasure; at this point, as a laboratory rat that, by pressing the right pedal down, compulsively turns itself on by exciting its centre of pleasure to the point of forgetting to eat, so, as human beings, we look for the repetition of our psychic satisfaction by relentlessly calling back the idea that literally drugs us, and so our cognitive obsessions constitute us, fulfil us, feed us and endure in probably each one of us. Edgar Morin. La Méthode. III. La connoissance de la connoissance/1.

Jerry Mander documented the problems related to television viewing in a time when that was almost the only screen people were staring at.The hyperactivity of TV imagery, while pacifying the brain, simultaneously speeds up the nervous system.

TV makes us both dumb and speedy. In the end, television viewing just prepares us for the appropriate mental state for video games and computer fixation. […] Scientists who study brain-wave activity found that the longer one watches television, the more likely the brain will slip into “alpha” level: a slow, steady brain-wave pattern in which the mind is in its most receptive mode. It is a noncognitive mode: i.e., information can be placed into the mind directly, without viewer participation. When watching television, people are receiving images into their brains without thinking about them. […] So television viewing, if it can be compared to a drug experience, seems to have many of the characteristics of Valium and other tranquilizers. But that is only half of the story. Actually, if television is a drug, it is not really Valium; it is speed. […] In their famous study of the effects of television, researchers at Australian National University predicted that as television became more popular in Australia, there would be a corresponding increase in hyperactivity among children. […] Here’s how it works: while sitting quietly in front of the TV, the child sees people punching each other on the screen. There is the impulse to react – the fight-or-flight instinct is activated – but since it would be absurd to react to a television fight, the child suppress the emotion. […] When the TV set is turned off, this stored-up energy bursts forth in the disorganized, frantic behavior that we associate with hyperactivity. Often, the only calming act is to turn the TV on again, which starts the cycle anew. [….] So television for youngsters, in addition to being a drug, can be understood as early training for “harderdrugs. Jerry Mander. In the absence of the sacred. Sierra Club. San Francisco. 1991

Staring at a screen, either a computer or TV screen, has initially a soothing effect, thoughts seems to slow down. It’s an illusion of reaching peace of mind, of reaching a state where we become still and peaceful, as in a meditative state.

The computer experience is much more powerful and complex than TV viewing because it mixes the passive state of staring at a screen with the frenzied activity of chasing after information, making contacts or being stimulated by sexual images or money related activities as online gambling, auctions or stock investing.

The seduction of Internet feeds a compulsive behaviour where we crave the appeal of a new email, of news, of contact with others through chat or forums. Social seeking behaviour and reward seeking behaviour intermingle. Social seeking has never been considered a compulsive or addictive behaviour but the current technology includes social life as just one more window present on the screen.

Even if they are not badly addicted, many people, myself included, experience difficulties in stopping online activity and can find themselves forgetting about eating, drinking, urinating, engaging with the people around them, or they postpone other activities in order to stay longer online. When other reward systems aren’t so appealing anymore, this is in itself a symptom of addiction.

Human physiology didn’t really change much since ancient times, physical development still works according to old patterns and hasn’t caught up with the huge cultural development that our minds have undergone over the centuries. At a bioenergetic level, when we sit at the computer we get powerful stimulations while our body is mostly still. My idea is that, since those stimulations can’t be balanced and released through the body, the energy gets stuck into the mind where it circles in loops looking for rewards, as a pale substitute for the real reward that an integrated connection with the body and deep mind stillness can give.

In this way porn and cybersex are an attempt to release tension and get back into body awareness. But even this kind of release has a short lasting effect since the experience is mostly driven by the same reward system mechanism.

Internet addition is quite difficult to get rid of it. First is not easily recognized since Internet and computer addiction can be masked by work and the need to be productive. Addicted people can justify their presence at the computer to themselves and to others with the need to “do” something.

If somebody is addicted to illegal substances like heroin or cocaine it is good to avoid every contact with the substance. It is also an important step in recovery for many addiction to avoid the setting, the places and objects associated with the addiction as well as other addicted people. But in the case of Internet addiction it is extremely difficult to avoid any contact with this medium since work, finance, travel planning, shopping, are all conducted online.

I notice that when I am far from Internet I can easily stay without it, then on the first contact after such a break, I say to myself “ok, I’ll just do this and that” then there is a compulsive feeling to do the other too, and check this and update that, and see if that site has anything new and… and… well, it just looks like the first glass of wine for an alcoholist that triggers all the others in an unstoppable chain.

The reward systems in our physiology haven’t been created for addictions, they have been created mainly for survival. Food and water and sex will give us a positive reward for ensuring the survival of our species.

My hypothesis is that addictions that have to do with the mind activity, such as computer addiction, follow a similar mechanism in order to keep the mind busy and therefore surviving. A silent mind would mean no-mind; silence and stillness are the worse enemy for the ego, that breeds thoughts continuously and feeds on them. This never-ending activity is a defence system of the mind in order not to lose its role as the main ego supporter. One of the many tricks the mind plays to safeguard its own survival.

The mind seems inclined to information overload and not easily satisfied as we would be on the body level after a big meal. The mind can create an almost infinite space to accommodate new information and new thoughts.

Those who practices meditation know how our mind seduces us and always tries to pull us in a net of thoughts and images to give our attention to. Meditation techniques that work on concentration and observation such as Vipassana have been developed as a way to observe our thoughts and emotions in a detached way in order to strengthen the witnessing and observing parts of the mind and weaken the distractive power of alluring thoughts.

When it comes to food intake, we became aware just in the past few decades of the deadly consequences of saturated fats, sugary foods and excessive consumption of red meats, which in the previous decades were greedily consumed as a celebration of abundance and improved economic status. With regard to information intake, we are now exposing ourselves to excesses, the ramifications of which will only be visible to us in the coming years. We waited with reforming our eating habits until there were tragic consequences for our bodies, hopefully we won’t delay adapting our computer behaviour until there are tragic consequences for the human mind.

In both industries there are enormous economic interests involved, therefore the growth of awareness of the possible dangers were very slow concerning food and are accordingly slow concerning technology. We will need “information dietetics”.

See also:

Neural reflexes and reflections on meditation

Disembodying at broadband speed

Heavenly Technology

The Tibetan watch: how a spiritual teacher learned about technology in the West

Virtual worlds and Maya 2.0

Bytes and bites of the net

Programming and self de-programming

Metabolizing information

Mental territories

Is Internet empowering us?

Wireless communication and reality mining as a reflection of pervasive consciousness

Multitasking to nothing

Biotech as an information system

Virtual worlds, mirror worlds, Second Life: backing up the messed planet

Mechanisms, mysticism and Amazon Mechanical Turk

Zen archery and computers

Lifelogging

The heart of the binary code

Downloading our life on Internet

Google, privacy and the need to be seen

Personal consumer
[/en][it]

Il nostro sistema nervoso possiede un meccanismo di gratificazione che, una volta attivato, può provocare processi compulsivi e di dipendenza. La dopamina è uno dei neurotrasmettitori del sistema nervoso che influenzano gli stati d’animo e le emozioni, ed è determinante nei sistemi di motivazione e gratificazione. Un sistema di gratificazione è un particolare processo cerebrale che regola il comportamento umano attraverso le sensazioni piacevoli.

Le due droghe più potenti, eroina e cocaina, stimolano l’attività della dopamina nel sistema nervoso; nello specifico, l’eroina aumenta la sintesi di dopamina, mentre la cocaina ne inibisce il riassorbimento. In entrambi i casi, si verifica un miglioramento dell’umore, che provoca il desiderio di ripetere l’esperienza, anche se le sensazioni provocate da queste droghe sono diverse. L’uso ripetuto può diminuire la quantità di dopamina nel sistema nervoso facendo sì che il meccanismo di gratificazione normale non sia più sufficiente, dando così origine al meccanismo di assuefazione. Queste alterazioni psicologiche sono probabilmente indispensabili per poter parlare di una vera e propria dipendenza.

Il sistema di gratificazione viene attivato anche dai piaceri naturali come il cibo, l’acqua, il sesso. Questi ultimi sono piacevoli in sé, per motivare le persone a sopravvivere e a preservare la specie. Talvolta anche questi sistemi naturali di ricompensa possono provocare dipendenza, ma la semplice attivazione del sistema di gratificazione nel cervello non è una dipendenza in sé. Per definizione, un comportamento dipendente si ha quando le gratificazioni normali non hanno più presa e il comportamento della persona viene alterato profondamente. Per esempio, il cibo, il sesso, il lavoro, la famiglia e la salute possono essere trascurati a causa di una dipendenza. Alcune sostanze, come l’eroina e la cocaina, generano una grande dipendenza e controllano il comportamento delle persone in modi estremi; altre esercitano un influsso minore.

A causa del grande sviluppo delle tecnologie e del numero crescente di persone che si connettono alla Rete per sempre più tempo e con connessioni sempre più veloci, aumenta il numero di coloro che in questa Rete restano intrappolati.

Su Internet, le persone possono diventare dipendenti dal gioco d’azzardo o i videogame online, la pornografia, il cybersex, le aste online, le chat, persino le news e il navigare in sé. I neuroscienziati hanno documentato anche come i centri cerebrali dell’apprendimento e del piacere siano gli stessi. Avere un’idea nuova, anche se non provoca dipendenza, genera una rilascio di sostanze euforizzanti, come la dopamina e le endorfine. Edgar Morin scrive sulle “ossessioni cognitive”:

Ciò che anima la ricerca è allo stesso tempo ciò che la parassita e l’inganna, quando la domanda ansiogena, portatrice delle angosce e dei tormenti esistenziali, scatena automaticamente e necessariamente la risposta soccorrevole (desiderata) che “fa bene” e anzi procura un godimento psichico prossimo al godimento fisico; a questo punto, come il topo di laboratorio che, premendo l’apposito pedale, si auto-eccita in modo coatto eccitando il proprio centro del piacere, sino al punto talvolta di dimenticare di nutrirsi, così l’essere umano cerca la ripetizione della sua soddisfazione psichica nel richiamo incessante dell’idea che letteralmente lo droga, e così si costituiscono, si soddisfano, si alimentano e si perpetuano, in ciascuno di noi probabilmente, le ossessioni cognitive. Edgar Morin. La conoscenza della conoscenza. Feltrinelli. Milano. 1989.

Jerry Mander ha documentato le problematiche connesse al guardare la televisione in un’epoca in cui essa era praticamente l’unico schermo disponibile.

L’iperattività delle immagini televisive, mentre da un lato acquieta il cervello, dall’altro accelera il sistema nervoso. La TV ci rende allo stesso tempo veloci e assopiti. In ultima analisi, guardare la TV ci prepara a quello stato mentale tipico dei videogame e della fissazione al computer. […] Gli scienziati che studiano l’attività delle onde cerebrali hanno scoperto che più si guarda la TV, più il cervello scivola in modalità “alfa”: una modalità di onde cerebrali lenta e fissa, in cui la mente è al massimo della ricettività. È una modalità non-cognitiva: ovvero, le informazioni possono essere immesse nella mente direttamente, senza partecipazione da parte dello spettatore. Quando la gente guarda la TV, riceve immagini nel proprio cervello senza riflettere su esse. […] Quindi, per fare un parallelo con le droghe, il guardare la TV sembra avere molte cose in comune con il Valium e altri tranquillanti. Ma questo è solo un lato della medaglia. In realtà, se la televisione è una droga, non è il Valium, è un’anfetamina. […] Nel loro famoso studio sugli effetti della televisione, i ricercatori dell’Australian National University hanno previsto che, parallelamente alla diffusione della TV in Australia, sarebbe aumentata l’iperattività dei bambini. […] Così funziona il processo: mentre sta seduto a guardare la TV, il bambino vede sullo schermo gente che si picchia. Sorge l’impulso di reagire – si attiva l’istinto lotta-o-fuggi – ma poiché sarebbe assurdo reagire a un litigio televisivo, il bambino reprime l’emozione. […] Quando la TV viene spenta, l’energia accumulata esplode in quel comportamento caotico e convulso che associamo all’iperattività. Spesso, l’unica azione calmante consiste nel riaccendere la TV, cominciando un nuovo ciclo. […] Quindi, per i più giovani, la televisione, oltre a costituire una droga, può essere vista come una preparazione precoce alle droge “più pesanti”.» . Jerry Mander. In the absence of the sacred. Sierra Club. San Francisco. 1991

Fissare uno schermo, che sia della TV o del computer, ha inizialmente un effetto calmante: i pensieri sembrano rallentare. Questa sensazione di pace mentale, di uno stato in cui siamo tranquilli e silenziosi – come in meditazione – è un’illusione.

L’esperienza del computer è molto più potente e complessa della TV, perché unisce la passività del guardare uno schermo alla frenesia del rincorrere informazioni, stabilire contatti, farsi stimolare da notizie, immagini sessuali o impegnarsi in attività finanziarie come le aste, gli investimenti in borsa o il gioco d’azzardo.

Internet alimenta un comportamento compulsivo che ci porta a rincorrere il piacere di ricevere un’email, trovare notizie, stringere rapporti attraverso chat o forum. La ricerca di socialità e di gratificazioni si mischiano. La ricerca di socialità non è mai stata considerata un comportamento compulsivo o dipendente, ma per la tecnologia moderna essa è semplicemente un’altra finestra sul monitor.

Anche se la nostra dipendenza non è grave, molte persone – me incluso – incontrano difficoltà a interrompere le attività online, e può succedere che ci si dimentichi di mangiare, bere, urinare, dare retta a chi ci sta accanto, oppure che si rinviino altre attività per poter stare più a lungo online. Quando l’interesse verso gli altri sistemi di gratificazione diminuisce, questo in sé è un sintomo di dipendenza.

La fisiologia umana non è cambiata molto dai tempi antichi: lo sviluppo fisico procede ancora secondo vecchi schemi e non si è adattato alla notevole evoluzione culturale attraversata dalla nostra mente nei secoli. A un livello bioenergetico, quando ci sediamo al computer riceviamo stimoli intensi, ma il nostro corpo è pressoché immobile. La mia idea è che, poiché questi stimoli non possono essere equilibrati e scaricati attraverso il corpo, l’energia resta bloccata nella mente, dove gira in tondo cercando gratificazioni, ovvero pallidi sostituti dell’autentica gratificazione rappresentata da una connessione integrata col corpo e da una mente profondamente silenziosa.

Da questo punto di vista, la pornografia e il cybersex sono un tentativo di sciogliere la tensione mentale e tornare alla consapevolezza corporea. Ma anche questo tipo di liberazione ha un effetto di breve durata, perché l’esperienza è per lo più guidata dal medesimo meccanismo di ricerca delle gratificazioni.

È particolarmente difficile liberarsi dalla dipendenza da Internet. Innanzitutto, essa non viene riconosciuta con facilità, perché la dipendenza da Internet e dal computer può nascondersi dietro il lavoro e l’esigenza di essere produttivi. Le persone dipendenti possono giustificare la loro presenza al computer, a se stesse e agli altri, con il bisogno di “fare” qualcosa.

Se qualcuno è dipendente da sostanze illegali come l’eroina o la cocaina, è bene evitare ogni contatto con tali sostanze. Un passo importante verso la guarigione, in molte dipendenze, è anche evitare i luoghi, il contesto e gli oggetti associati alla dipendenza, oltre che le persone dipendenti. Ma nel caso di una dipendenza da Internet, è estremamente difficile evitare ogni contatto con questo medium, perché il lavoro, gli affari, l’organizzazione dei viaggi, lo shopping, vengono tutti effettuati online.

Mi accorgo che quando sono lontano da Internet posso starne facilmente senza. Poi, dopo il primo contatto con esso, mi dico: «OK, farò solo questo e quello», ma poi sorge un bisogno compulsivo di fare qualcos’altro, controllare qui e aggiornare là, vedere se in quel sito ci sono novità e… Beh, sembra proprio il primo bicchiere di vino di un alcolizzato, che si trascina dietro tutti gli altri bicchieri in una catena inarrestabile.

I nostri sistemi di gratificazione fisiologici non sono stati creati affinché diventassimo dipendenti, ma affinché sopravvivessimo. Cibo, acqua e sesso ci forniscono gratificazioni positive per assicurare la sopravvivenza della nostra specie.

La mia ipotesi che è le dipendenze connesse all’attività mentale, come la dipendenza da computer, seguono un meccanismo simile per tenere la mente occupata, e quindi farla sopravvivere. Una mente silenziosa significherebbe una non-mente; il silenzio e l’immobilità sono i peggiori nemici dell’ego, che genera e si nutre continuamente di pensieri. Questa incessante attività è un sistema di difesa della mente per non perdere la sua funzione di principale sostegno dell’ego, ovvero uno dei suoi molti trucchi per sopravvivere. La mente sembra incline a un sovraccarico di informazioni, né si appaga facilmente, come invece avviene a livello del corpo dopo un pasto abbondante. La mente è in grado di fare continuamente spazio a sempre nuovi pensieri e informazioni.

Coloro che praticano la meditazione sanno come la mente ci seduce cercando sempre di attirarci in una rete di pensieri e immagini a cui dare retta. Le tecniche di meditazione che lavorano sulla concentrazione e l’osservazione, come la Vipassana, sono state sviluppate per osservare i nostri pensieri ed emozioni in modo distaccato, e rafforzare quindi la parte di osservazione e di “testimone” della mente, indebolendo la forza dispersiva dei pensieri seducenti.

Riguardo l’assunzione di cibo, solo nei decenni passati siamo diventati consapevoli degli effetti devastanti dei grassi saturi, gli zuccheri e le carni rosse, i quali negli anni precedenti erano stati abbondantemente consumati e celebrati come simboli dell’abbondanza e del benessere economico. Riguardo l’assunzione di informazioni, stiamo vivendo ora gli eccessi, e le conseguenze saranno visibili solo nei prossimi anni. Per cambiare abitudini alimentari, abbiamo aspettato le tragiche conseguenze sui nostri corpi: ora speriamo di non dover aspettare conseguenze tragiche sulla mente umana per cambiare il nostro rapporto con il computer e le informazioni.

In entrambe le industrie ci sono enormi interessi economici in gioco, quindi la consapevolezza dei possibili pericoli connessi al cibo è cresciuta lentamente, e sta crescendo lentamente per quelli connessi alla tecnologia. Avremo bisogno di una dietetica informativa.

Vedi anche:

Riflessi neurali e riflessioni sulla meditazione

Rendendoci incorporei a velocità di banda larga

Tecnologie divine

L’orologio tibetano: come un insegnante spirituale venne a conoscenza della tecnologia in Occidente

Mondi virtuali e Maya 2.0

La morsa e i morsi della rete

Programmazione e de-programmazione di sè

Metabolizzare le informazioni

Territori mentali

Internet aumenta davvero il nostro potere?

La comunicazione senza fili e il reality mining come riflesso della consapevolezza globale

Il multitasking: strafare per niente

Le biotecnologie come sistema informativo

Mondi virtuali, mondi specchio, Second Life: fare il backup di un pianeta nel caos

Meccanismi, misticismi e Mechanical Turk di Amazon

Il tiro con l’arco Zen e i computer

Lifelogging

Il cuore del codice binario

Download della vita su Internet

Google, la privacy e il mettersi in mostra

Personal consumatore

[/it]

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0
This work is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0.